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A teen phobia is an intense fear related to some specific person, thing, or event. A person can have a phobia, based on some past traumatic event or experience, or it can exist independent of any known or obvious reason. This overwhelming fear is so encompassing that it can often produce a panic attack if the person comes into contact with the phobia trigger. Because of this, a person with a phobia will make great efforts to avoid any situation or context in which they’ll have to face or address it, which can create difficulty around the person trying to lead a normal, productive life.

(Paradigm Malibu: Adolescent Treatment Center)

Causes

Genetic and environmental factors can cause phobias. Children who have a close relative with an anxiety disorder are at risk for developing a phobia. Distressing events such as nearly drowning can bring on a phobia. Exposure to confined spaces, extreme heights, and animal or insect bites can all be sources of phobias.

 

People with ongoing medical conditions or health concerns often have phobias. There is a high incidence of people developing phobias after traumatic brain injuries. Substance abuse and depression are also connected to phobias.

(Healthline)

 

The symptoms of a phobia can range from mild feelings of apprehension and anxiety to a full-blown panic attack. Typically, the closer you are to the thing you’re afraid of, the greater your fear will be. Your fear will also be higher if getting away is difficult.

 

Physical signs and symptoms of a phobia

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Racing or pounding heart
  • Chest pain or tightness
  • Trembling or shaking
  • Feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • A churning stomach
  • Hot or cold flashes; tingling sensations
  • Sweating

Emotional signs and symptoms of a phobia

  • Feeling of overwhelming anxiety or panic
  • Feeling an intense need to escape
  • Feeling “unreal” or detached from yourself
  • Fear of losing control or going crazy
  • Feeling like you’re going to die or pass out
  • Knowing that you’re overreacting, but feeling powerless to control your fear

(HelpGuide.org)